Jerome Richardson - Midnight Oil

Jerome Richardson Midnight Oil (New Jazz 1958)

Perhaps Jerome Richardson ‘burnt the midnight oil’ at the Hackensack, New Jersey studio of Rudy van Gelder and hence came up with the title for his excellent debut as a leader on the New Jazz label.

Jerome Richardson - Midnight Oil

Personnel

Jerome Richardson (flute, tenor saxophone), Jimmy Cleveland (trombone), Kenny Burrell (guitar), Hank Jones (piano), Joe Benjamin (bass), Charlie Persip (drums)

Recorded

in 1958 at Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey

Released

as NJLP 8205 in 1959

Track listing

Side A:
Minorally
Way In Blues
Delirious Trimmings
Side B:
Caravan
Lyric


Acursory look at the recordings made during the classic age of hard bop and mainstream jazz cannot but reveal the name of Jerome Richardson. The Oakland, California-born flutist and saxophone player (1920-2000), who was in the bands of Lionel Hampton from 1949-51 and Earl Hines from 1954-55, is on plenty hi-profile albums by Kenny Clarke, Cannonball Adderley, Gene Ammons, Randy Weston, Sonny Stitt, Milt Jackson, Kenny Burrell, Quincy Jones, Jimmy Smith, Johnny Hodges, Dizzy Gillespie, George Benson and Oliver Nelson. Richardson was featured on Charles Mingus’ Town Hall Concert, Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus Mingus and Black Saint And The Sinner Lady. A sought-after, versatile gentleman, who was accomplished on flute, alto flute, piccolo, clarinet and bass clarinet, tenor, soprano, alto and baritone sax. Perhaps his striking versatility is the reason why Richardson was occasionally bereft of a solo spot. However, once Richardson had a go, everyone obviously knew what was the score.

Unfortunately, recordings as a leader by Richardson were few and far between. Midnight Oil was followed by the equally impressive Roamin’ With Richardson in 1959. In the sixties, Richardson made two albums, the concept album Goin’ To The Movies and the groovy soul jazz album on Verve, Groove Merchant. His final release in 1996, Jazz Station Runaway, saw Richardson cooperating with Russell Malone, George Mraz, Lewis Nash and David Hazeltine. His two albums from the late fifties are hi-calibre affairs. Perhaps Midnight Oil has the edge on Roamin’. Immediately obvious is its excellent writing. Side A is filled with three Richardson originals, the uptempo hard bop gem Minorally, sly blues line Way In Blues and Delirious Trimmings, a fluent piece reminiscent of the crafty Mulligan tunes that he wrote for his celebrated Mulligan/Baker outfit.

Few dig the blues on flute as convincing as Jerome Richardson. This has become evident on, for instance, his contributions to Eddie “Lockjaw” Davis’ Cookbook Volume 1-3 albums. Moreover, the effects that Richardson creates with his abundant technique, guttural or breathy sounds, expand his natural blues feeling. On tenor, he’s a diamond in the rough, blowing hard and gutsy, a combination founded on excellent skills. At the time – 1958 – Richardson seems clearly impressed by John Coltrane and also possesses a bit of the urgency and bare, honest emotions of Booker Ervin.

Side B contains Caravan, marked by a hefty treatment of the rhythm during the melody and a fluently swinging B-section, and a bouncy, lithely swinging take on the frolic Artie Shaw melody Lyric. During the biggest part of the session, the combination of flute, trombone and guitar provides a pleasant, dense and cushion-soft texture, underscored by the elegant, ever-so-right phrases of Hank Jones, tasteful, spicy licks of Kenny Burrell and the tight-knit rhythm section of Joe Benjamin and Charlie Persip. Special mention of Persip, whose concise work on the New Jazz label is strikingly crisp, clever and energetic. Midnight Oil is fine Persip, but one hasn’t lived the jazz fan’s life without hearing his drumming on Mal Waldron’s The Quest!

Bay 3

B3 ORGAN FESTIVAL – That is going to be a lot of stops and drawbars. Most likely the B3 Organ Festival, held from September 20-23 in San Francisco, sets a Guiness World Record. But importantly, the festival, programmed by radio host and long-time ambassador of organ jazz Pete “Doodlin’ Lounge” Fallico as part of the SF Jazz Festival, offers a rich array of Hammond grooves. On the bill are heroes of the Hammond B3 organ Lonnie Smith, Reuben Wilson, Chester Thompson, Ronnie Foster and Joey DeFrancesco, as well as new stars and up-and-coming acts as Cory Henry & The Funk Apostles, Howard Wiley & Extra Nappy and Tammy Hall. A big treat for lovers of organ jazz, the genre that keeps building on the tradition and innovations of the church, Wild Bill Davis, Jimmy Smith, Larry Young and others.

Visit the B3 Organ Festival on September 20-23 at SF Jazz Center, 201 Franklin Street, San Francisco. Tickets available here.

Appetite For Seduction

NEW RELEASE – THE WHITE BLINDS

If you like your groove hefty and in-your-face, try Get To Steppin’ by The White Blinds.

The White Blinds - Get To Steppin'

Personnel

Carey Frank (organ), Matt Hornbeck (guitar), Michael Duffy (drums)

Recorded

in 2018 at Rich Uncle Records

Released

as FSPT 2001 in 2018

Track listing

Chico
Hip Hugger
A Walk Through Echo Park
Little Giant
Blinded
Get To Steppin’
Cold Heat
The Doc
Blue Juice


Ask a random passerby if he knows who is Zigaboo Modeliste. In all likelihood, he/she’ll raise an eyebrow. Obviously, serious music lovers will answer that he was the drummer of The Meters, the legendary New Orleans Funk outfit whose greasy and clever funk had a pervasive influence on popular music, inspiring a diversity of acts from The Rolling Stones to hiphop posses. The White Blinds KNOW their Meters, as well as music akin to it, like late 60s/early 70s soul and funk jazz. Underlined by the sustained energy of punk rock, the tight-knit trio from Los Angeles is off and running. The White Blinds are drummer Michael Duffy, organist Carey Frank and guitarist Matt Hornbeck, fixtures on the Californian soul and funk scene. The trio has released its debut album Get To Steppin’ on F-Spot Records in the summer of 2018.

Even if soul jazz may not be, as it was in the sixties, music for Afro-American folks to have an exciting evening after a day of hard labor, the contemporary audience can relate to high-quality jazz meant for relaxation. It ideally includes a certain kind of sexy vibe, capable of making people feel loose and receptive for their surroundings, not necessarily for orgasm, instead for playfulness, desire, communion. Erotica then, instead of sex, is the word in this respect. Tailor-made for inhabitants of Erotic City, this set of White Blinds soul jazz and jazz funk is uplifting, the pull of the sleazy Hammond organ, spicy guitar and roaring rolls and tight pocket of Michael Duffy’s Idris Muhammad-meets-Bernard Purdie-drums rather irresistible. Lurid grooves mark tunes as Chico, Hip Hugger, The Hustler and Get To Steppin’.

The old-school Hammond/Leslie speaker-sound of Blinded is underscored by a healthy cluster of screamin’ phrases by Carey Frank. He showcases a variety of sounds throughout the album. Matt Hornbeck, a relaxed architect of concise funk-blues stories, utilizing sly bending of notes and the occasional chickin’ pickin’ lick, gets a chance to stretch out during Jimmy McGriff’s blues line Blue Juice. ‘Jazz rockabilly’ might be the appropriate term for Little Giant, which is distinguished by varied opposing rhythm and tacky breaks. The Doc is the kind of soul tune Quincy Jones could’ve written in the early seventies for young couples to slow dance to nervously, bereft of swag and sweating like pigs.

A bit of transpiration never hurt anybody, not least the customers of the good-ol’ soul jazz genre, which Get To Steppin’ is a fine expansion of.

Check out the album and website of The White Blinds here. Also available on vinyl, including a 45rpm single.

The Cannonball Adderley Quintet - Country Preacher

Cannonball Adderley Quintet Country Preacher (Capitol 1969)

The hefty stew of boiling groovy thickness and powerful prayer meeting that is The Cannonball Adderley Quintet’s Country Preacher – Live At Operation Breadbasket is the climax in their book of epic live performances it began a decade earlier with In San Francisco and At The Lighthouse.

The Cannonball Adderley Quintet - Country Preacher

Personnel

Cannonball Adderley (alto saxophone, soprano saxophone), Nat Adderley (cornet, vocals), Joe Zawinul (electric piano), Walter Booker (bass), Roy McCurdy (drums)

Recorded

in October, 1969 in Chicago

Released

as Capitol 404 in 1970

Track listing

Side A:
Walk Tall
Country Preacher
Hummin’
Oh Babe
Side B:
Afro-Spanish Omelet
a.Umbakwen
b.Soli Tomba
c.Oiga
d.Marabi
The Scene


The fundamental premise of Operation Breadbasket was equal economic opportunity for the black community. Founded by Leon Sullivan in Philadelphia in 1962 and further developed by Martin Luther King in Atlanta, it negotiated jobs for people in the ghetto and strived to correct the perverse fact that industries sold product in black neighbourhoods but seldom offered decent positions besides menial labor. Boycotting companies was but one of the strategies of the persuasive core of black ministry. King appointed Jesse Jackson as leader of the Chicago department, which fell under the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. (SCLC) Chicago Breadbasket was a success, winning many new jobs. It also became a cultural event, inspired by the weekly Saturday sermons by Reverend Jesse Jackson. Jackson became the national director of Operation Breadbasket in 1967.

It was tangible. There was something in the air tonight. Cannonball, his voice a bit hoarse from a cold, his stomach presumably still digesting a copious meal, is up for the task. The band, simultaneously charged and relaxed, sits at the knees of the Reverend Jesse Jackson, who has provided a focused and fiery sermon, and subsequently is basking in the pleasure of hearing another exciting performance at an Operation Breadbasket meeting, in church in Chicago, and surely the most sizzling to date. The heat is on.

The Reverend, or the Country Preacher (the second tune of the album, Joe Zawinul’s Country Preacher, is dedicated to Jackson), was in full bloom in 1969, as can be heard on the quintet’s album on the Capitol label. Walk Tall is preceded by a spirited bit of sermonizing from Jackson, who can’t help spouting some painful, redeeming truths during his introduction of the band: ‘The most important thing of all is that, not matter how dreary the situation is, and how difficult it may be, that the storm really doesn’t matter until the storm begins to get you down, so I advice to you, the message The Cannonball Adderley Quintet brings to us, is that it’s rough and tough in this getto, a lot of funny stuff going down, but you gotta walk tall!, walk TALL!!, WALK TALL!!!’ Whereupon McCurdy, Booker and Zawinul put down a lurid boogaloo-ish groove, acted upon by the roaring unison brass and reed of Nat and Cannonball Adderley, a perfectly attuned imagination of the cathartic mirror Jackson held forth to the evening’s audience. The eloquent Cannonball, who also puts in a few strong-willed words, and the ambitious orator Jesse Jackson are a challenging match.

It is a match that raises questions too. Ever since the killing of Martin Luther King, Jesse Jackson, candidate for the Democratic presidential campaign in 1984 and 1988, has been a popular but controversial figure, perhaps never more so than immediately after that horrible event in Memphis, Tennessee on April 4, 1968. Although evidence was feeble, Jackson has always maintained the claim that he’d held the dying King in his arms, hence the blood on his turtleneck sweater. The turtleneck sweater controversy was born. A day after the murder of Reverend King, prime national spearhead of the black cause, Jackson appeared in a television show, wearing the bloody sweater and telling his story. King’s wife and close King associates, especially Ralph Abernathy, the former leader of the SCLC, were shocked and a schism in the SCLC and black power movement was a fact. The survivors and successors of the cause are fighting to this day, a shameful page in the story of black unity. Naturally, let there be no mistake, nothing should be taken away from Cannonball Adderley, who participated in the musical and socio-cultural event with the zest and goodwill we’ve come to associate with the amiable alto saxophonist. One keeps wondering though if Cannonball realized that, by embracing Jesse Jackson, the coldshouldering of Abernathy-and-friends was a logical consequence?

He definitely was conscious of his musical heritage. Prime ambassador for jazz, Cannonball had always been introducing the group’s music in humorous and insightful fashions, the initial introductions ten years earlier on the Live In San Francisco album functioning as a catalyst for soul jazz, or jazz for Chuck Chitlin & Big Mary (Bobby Timmons’ funky This Here the tune that got feet tappin’). In 1969, Cannonball again is the perfect host, elaborating concisely on the content of the compositions and the value of black music. As he succinctly and matter-of-factly explains during his introduction of the roaring 12-bar blues Oh Baby, ‘a soulful excursion into the past, the present AND the future of our music.’ It oozes pride for a truly American art form, a music born out of enslavement, degradation and misery, with a cast of legends that were unfortunately still unknown to most Americans. Perhaps he is not saying it very loud like James Brown, or anguished like Nina “Mississippi Goddamn” Simone, but the message is clear.

However, for the message to be clear, one has to think a bit further. Cannonball talks about black music. Assumingly, Cannonball, a streetwise, genial and intelligent personality, was of the opinion that black music is potentially inclusive, that at least a number of white men/women were able to play black music. One member of his group, Joe Zawinul, comes from Austria. Past member Victor Feldman was praised by Cannonball for his blues-infested skills. Cannonball’s cooperation with Bill Evans for the album Know What I Mean was one of his most gratifying experiences, not to say a major artistic achievement. In Evans’ case, surely Cannonball felt that something very distinctive was added to the music that had its origins in New Orleans. I’m guessing that Cannonball wouldn’t dispute the idea that whites had a distinct role in the development of jazz from the beginning. But he realized that the black experience intensifies the music, and that once you take away the core of jazz – the blues – you’re left with lifeless notes and tones. It was 1969, jazz had suffered blows, rock and pop reigned supreme, obviously Cannonball wanted to keep jazz real, fresh and energetic. Good job too!

By the way, not only the gig, all funk, sleaze, slow drag, tough swing and sparkling Afro-Jazz, is a wonderful exercise in rhythm, even these speeches by Cannonball move with a smooth, danceable beat. This way they have a penchant of seguing into the tracks, of which Spanish Omelet, an Afro-Cuban ‘suite’, is the longest by far, taking up most of side B. Structure-wise, it may not be so interesting, as it’s low on coherent motives, yet it’s the expressive force that somehow makes five parts a whole, from the lilting melancholy of Nat Adderley’s flamenco-ish Umbakwen, the singing, bended notes of bassist Walter Booker’s a capella Soli Tomba, Joe Zawinul’s hard modal funk of Oiga to the uplifting swingbop of Cannonball’s showstopper Marabi. Spanish Omelet is home cookin’, lively chatter in Erotic City, the brooding presence of hard-boiled Romeo, who stands on the corner, unfazed, bleeding from his elbow… It’s this kind of soul fusion (Adderley would delve deeper into bonafide fusion with 1971’s The Black Messiah and 1974’s Pyramid) that reduces the languid Bitches Brew by Miles Davis, recorded a couple of months before Country Preacher, to background music for spliff smokers.

Good news. The rest is just as sizzling. Jammin’ on one chord has seldom been brought to the fore so successfully as during Nat Adderley’s Hummin’. A slow groove built up by very heavy percussion and bass, Nat Adderley plays with the sureness of a customer who ends a bar row and subsequently has couples dancing with his tipsy singsong, spitting, coughing, growling, while Cannonball, on soprano, is like a fellow working the cottage doors with sandpaper, sweat on his back and brows, a couple of hours away from a refreshing bottle of beer. Oh Baby finds Nat Adderley in the limelight again, takin’ care of business singing the blues with a lurid sense of self-mockery.

Zawinul’s Country Preacher, a slow soul tune, is an exercise in tension and release, and the audience goes berserk, not unlike the responses Otis Redding, Solomon Burke, Sam & Dave, Ike & Tina or Aretha Franklin brought about. That’s the piece of land these fellows had staked out for themselves in jazz country. Country Preacher: Live At Operation Breadbasket is expressive, eloquent soul power. It’s pleasantly un-programmatic, possesses a let’s play in the sunshine-ish innocence, yet it’s solid as a rock. It doesn’t come any sleazier and real. A serious party.

Serge Chaloff - Blue Serge

Serge Chaloff Blue Serge (Capitol 1956)

A year after the passing of Charlie Parker, the influential bop baritone saxophonist Serge Chaloff delivered his best album, Blue Serge.

Serge Chaloff - Blue Serge

Personnel

Serge Chaloff (baritone saxophone), Sonny Clark (piano), Leroy Vinegar (bass), Philly Joe Jones (drums)

Recorded

on March 14 & 16, 1956 at Capitol Studio, Los Angeles

Released

as T-742 in 1956

Track listing

Side A:
A Handful Of Stars
The Goof And I
Thanks For The Memory
All The Things You Are
Side B:
I’ve Got The World On A String
Susie’s Blues
Stairway To The Stars
How About You?


Parker’s redefinitions of the jazz language represented nothing less than an earthquake and certainly also bedazzled Serge Chaloff, who was born in Boston in 1923 from parents who were music teachers, with father Julius serving as pianist in the Boston Symphony Orchestra. Chaloff, who passed away in 1957, came up through the groups of Boyd Raeburn, Woody Herman (as part of the acclaimed Four Brothers reed section of the Second Herd), Georgie Auld, Jimmy Dorsey and Count Basie. His other influence beside Parker was baritone sax pioneer Harry Carney, longtime member of the Duke Ellington Orchestra. Both influences shine through on Blue Serge, Chaloff’s album that’s appropriately named after Duke Ellington’s composition, with a nod to the very blue Serge. The influences are incorporated into Chaloff’s remarkably fecund style, a style that locks tight with the alert, cookin’ Philly Joe Jones, the big-toned Leroy Vinegar, all-round bass class act and particularly exquisite as a ‘walker’, and Sonny Clark, master of long, horn-like lines and varied rhythmic placement.

Hi-level company: Jones on the brink of his defining role in the First Great Quintet of Miles Davis, embryonic vistas of Cool Struttin’ in the background of Clark’s mind, no other horn except baritone, Chaloff pulling it off as a distinct voice and stylist with graceful fluidity on the baritone saxophone, a feat that speaks volumes about the man’s authority. Chaloff’s sinuous, propulsive lines dance through a set of fast bop, ballads and medium tempo swingers on familiar changes. He’s a captivating balladeer that speaks to a lover both with sweet, breathy whispers and husky, sardonic, slightly vibrating comments on the one hand, a virtuoso who travels with deceptive ease through fast-paced burners on the other hand.

And whether it’s the loping tempo of A Handful Of Stars or the quicksilver pace of Al Cohn’s The Goof And I, instead of being led by it, Chaloff directs the flow of the quartet. Blue Serge is such an excellent session because that conductive quality is a talent that Chaloff shares with Clark, both possessing acute melodic rhythm and effortless flow. The mark of great players, particularly coming to the fore in receptive surroundings, and a mark we perhaps most of the time grasp intuitively, then finding it a marvel.

Chaloff was a major innovator on the baritone saxophone, paving the way for Cecil Payne, Pepper Adams and modern-day greats like Gary Smulyan, but his reputation is hampered by a concise discography, the direct result of the man’s addiction to drugs and the resulting struggles of maintaining proper work relations. Allegedly, Charlie Parker advised his disciples time and again to stay away from the stuff, most of the time to no avail, certainly in the case of Chaloff, a notorious user and rebel rouser. How tragic that, once Chaloff kicked the habit in 1957, having returned to his native city of Boston, he was diagnosed with spinal cancer and passed away on July 16. Regardless, Chaloff left us a magnificent piece of bari playing that is still fresh after all these years.

Killers of B3

ORGAN JAZZ IN THE 21ST CENTURY – First there was the church. Then there were Wild Bill Davis, Jimmy Smith, Larry Young and many excellent and exciting jazz organists. Since, the Hammond organ has become an invaluable supporter of pop, soul, country, rock and hip-hop music. Now we’ve landed in the 21st century. A brave new world protested against by a variety of accomplished players like Joey DeFrancesco, Larry Goldings and John Medeski, who’ve been loving the grease while enhancing the jazz organ tradition in fresh and energetic ways. Perhaps the roller rink history of the organ is still occasionally scaring of some listeners and musicians. But no doubt, the variety of sonic possibilities of the organ and the distinctive oscillations of its favorite cousin, the Leslie speaker, (don’t we love that sound!) keeps inspiring new generations to have a go and groove! Some of those talented artists and groups are ranked below, as well as a number of longtime creative players who may have escaped your attention. Enjoy!

The White Blinds

That’s a swell band name. It beats The Venetian Blinds. As far as Venice is concerned, we’re very close. Venice, California, that is. The White Blinds hail from Los Angeles and consist of three fixtures of the LA funk and soul scene, drummer Michael Duffy, organist Carey Frank and guitarist Matt Hornbeck. The group locks into a definite pocket, inspired by classic soul and funk jazz of the sixties and seventies. The release of their debut album, Get To Steppin’, is due for release in September on F-Spot Records.

The White Blinds

Check out the website of The White Blinds here.

Listen to their single Get To Steppin’ on YouTube. Remember Charles Earland, Boogaloo Joe Jones and Bernard Purdie?

Blue Note Organ Trio

NNostalgia has a counter-productive inkling and retro can get pretty tedious. But certainly not in the hands of the snappy Blue Note Organ Trio, which provides multi-media evenings of ‘repertoire exclusively from 1952-67 Era Blue Note Records’. Yes, that’s right! Blue Mitchell, Grant Green, Lee Morgan, Donald Byrd, Sonny Clark, etc. The Italian organist Leonardo Corradi and the Greek guitarist Michael Papadopoulos and drummer Sera Bellos are ranked among the finest jazz musicians of their generation in their countries. Take a good listen. These guys have their shit together.

Blue Note Organ Trio

Check out the website of Blue Note Organ Trio here.

Listen to their version of Donald Byrd’s Off To The Races on YouTube. Bit of Art Blakey in there too!

Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio

From Seattle comes the Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio. Delvin Lamarr (there are worse endings of names for an organist than Marr) on organ, Jimmy James on guitar and David McGraw on drums. A healthy dose of soul jazz, meaning jazz sensibility with a solid and entertaining backbone of soul and rhythm and blues. The debut album of the group, Close But No Cigar, which was released independently in 2016, has seen wide release by Columine in 2018. Also on vinyl, not only LP but 7inch as well. Paper sleeve and blue/white (!) label, like the vintage jukebox singles.

Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio

Check out the website of the Delvon Lamarr Organ Trio here.

Listen to their version of Curtis Mayfield’s Move On Up on YouTube. Sweet stuff.

Montis, Goudsmit & Directie

Montis, Goudsmit & Directie bring the house down like few contemporary groups. Frank Montis, (born Van de Berge) otherwise a very soulful singer and songwriter in the pop jazz field, plays organ Jimmy Smith/Jimmy McGriff-style. A funky, blues-drenched cat. The trio also includes Anton Goudsmit, maverick jazz guitarist and composer, and Cyril Directie, versatile and explosive pop, r&b and jazz drummer. On – and off – stage Montis, Goudsmit & Directie may resemble The Marx Brothers high on Benzedrine. Looks deceive, this deeply involved, expert bunch strikes some serious notes.

Montis, Goudsmit & Directie

Check out the website of Montis, Goudsmit & Directie here.

Here’s their take on Al Green’s Let’s Stay Together on YouTube. Subtle but propulsive!

Arno Krijger

Partaking in the adventures of the avant-leaning German trombonist/composer Nils Wogram’s Nostalgia for a number of years now has been a boost to the career and a challenge to the development of the Dutch organist Arno Krijger. His style, influenced by major innovator Larry Young, is tailor-made for daring searches of new land. A refined player with groove roots, Krijger is involved in myriad projects. His involvement with the Belgian saxophonist Toine Thys has been very rewarding. And The Professionalz come to mind, a trio also consisting of drummer Lucas van Merwijk and guitarist Ed Verhoeff, which limits their song playing time to 3 minutes, just like ‘the old days’ of the 78rmp era. Their album, 3 Minute Pieces, was released in 2018 on TamTam.

Arno Krijger

Check out the website of Arno Krijger here.

Listen to the Toine Thys Trio, assisted by guitarist Hervé Samb, play the Afro-Funk-ish Grizzly on YouTube. Four very original gentlemen.

Carlo de Wijs

Aveteran by now, Carlo de Wijs is one of the Hammond organ players in Europe to go to for real jazz and plenty groove. Carlo de Wijs, busy in the popular field as well, made his first album appearance on tenor saxophonist Harry Verbeke’s Mo de Bo in 1985 and never looked back. De Wijs has a striking love for the organ. Besides building analogue/digital B3 hybrids, De Wijs is a teacher of organ jazz at Codarts, Rotterdam – a novelty. By the way, the organist occasionally performs with the above-mentioned Arno Krijger during what is called Hammond Sandwich. A passion dance.

Carlo de Wijs

Check out the website of Carlo de Wijs here.

This is the Z-Shuffle (For Joe Zawinul) on YouTube. An acute and gritty performance.

Simon Oslender

Simon Oslender, born in Aachen, Germany in 1998, is an incredible talent with a bag full of experience at the young age of 20. He played and recorded with Dr. Lonnie Smith, Phil Lassiter, Jazz Orchestra Of The Concertgebouw, Wolfgang Haffner and Benjamin Herman, among others. A sought-after player in jazz and jazz-related music, one of Oslender’s favorite projects is Pimpy Pandy, a crossover unit in the vein of Snarky Puppy.

Simon Oslender

Check out the website of Simon Oslender here.

Hear Simon solo during a tour with Philip Lassiter on YouTube. Wild!

Will Blades

“The future” of organ jazz, according to the legendary Dr. Lonnie Smith. Will Blades is in high demand, having worked with, among others, Idris Muhammad, Bernard Purdie, Melvin Sparks, John Scofield, Nicholas Payton and Billy Martin. Crunchy and/or eerie sounds from synths are the cherries on top of his fresh playing on the Hammond organ. Blades is not alone in this series as a player who makes excellent use of his heartfelt roots in soul, r&b, blues, funk and rock. Willing to carry organ jazz to the next centuries. Long live the killer B3!

Will Blades

Check out the website of Will Blades here.

Here’s Blades with Billy Martin doing the Little Shimmy. That rocks.

Arno Krijger pic: Photography Dieter Duvelmeyer
Will Blades pic: Photography nikof.photo@gmail.com

Johnny Lytle - Blue Vibes

Johnny Lytle Blue Vibes (Jazzland 1960)

Blue Vibes propelled the career of the superb vibraphonist Johnny Lytle.

Johnny Lytle - Blue Vibes

Personnel

Johnny Lytle (vibraphone), Milton Harris (organ), Albert Heath (drums)

Recorded

on June 16, 1960 in New York City

Released

JLP 22 in 1960

Track listing

Side A:
Blue Vibes
Over The Rainbow
For Heaven’s Sake
Movin’ Nicely
Side B:
Autumn Leaves
Mister Trundel
Canadian Sunset


Mount Rushmore of vibraphonists? That would be Lionel Hampton, Milt Jackson, Dave Pike and Bobby Hutcherson. Agree? No, I hear you say, better start grinding an extra stone for Gary Burton. There were/are a lot of great vibe players. Red Norvo (who started out on xylophone), Teddy Charles, Terry Gibbs, Buddy Montgomery, Mike Mainieri, Steve Nelson and, in The Netherlands, Frits Landesbergen. The name of Johnny Lytle now and then still crops up, deservedly so. The Springfield, Ohio-born vibraphonist, (1925-1995) like Hampton and Landesbergen also an acclaimed drummer, was a reasonably popular artist on the rosters of the Riverside, Tuba and Solid State labels in the sixties, scoring especially well with The Village Caller (1963) and The Loop (1965).

He was a professional boxer as well, battling well into the late fifties when Lytle was active as a drummer for Ray Charles, Jimmy Witherspoon and Gene Ammons. Nicknamed “Fast Hands” for his showmanship and remarkable agility, Lytle started recording steadily in 1960. It adds up. Good pugilists have a delicate sense of rhythm. And their fight is a dance, needs to swing and groove. The drums and the vibraphone share the percussive aspect, while melodic swing is paramount. Miles Davis was attracted to boxing for a number of reasons. No fights in the ring for Miles though, contrary to Jack Johnson, Red Garland, Johnny Lytle. One of Lytle’s tunes on his 1966 New And Groovy album is titled Selim. Miles spelled backwards, obviously. Lytle liked boxing and Miles Davis. Makes sense. I’m more into snooker and Miles Davis, which may seem nerdy, but that’s just what the Good Lord cued up for yours truly the Flophouse Floor Manager.

His debut album Blue Vibes, which includes Milton Harris on organ and Albert “Tootie” Heath on drums, finds Lytle in straight-ahead jazz territory, less ‘soul jazzy’ than his mid-sixties efforts, and it’s a winner. Lytle offers a couple of proper ballad interpretations, Over The Rainbow and For Heaven’s Sake. The array of sounds that Lytle coaxes from the vibraphone, from dry, staccato notes, sustained bell-like sirens to eerie pre-sixties-soundtrack-ish phrases is surprising. How Lytle does it I don’t know! But the variation is effective and striking, like the unpredictable steps of Muhammad Ali. Standards like Autumn Leaves and Canadian Sunset are infested with healthy doses of groove and blues. In fact, the blues-based repertory of the Lytle compositions Blue Vibes and Mister Trundel and Milt Jackson’s Movin’ Nicely is what makes one eager to purchase this Jazzland vinyl. Or, if a quick buy is out of the question, run to the Spotify link below. The former‘s the best option. The latter, connected with Bluetooth to the speakers, might give one unsound bytes and blue vibes.

No doubt there’s something about the combination of vibes, organ and drums. Harris knows when to scream, add slices of melodrama or back off into a corner. “Tootie” Heath adds a number of crazy rolls. The trio grooves thoroughly. It’s the balance between the fire of r&b and jazz sophistication that makes Blue Vibes such an enjoyable date.